The Whale Coast Conservation hosted a Sustainable Future exhibition at the Stanford Village Hall on Tuesday morning and I enjoyed seeing the eagerness and attentiveness of the young people from Die Bron Primary School who were at the exhibition at the same time as I was.

During the course of May  the Expo will be seen by an average of 80 children from 30 schools in Gansbaai, Stanford, Hermanus, Zwelihle, Hawston and Kleinmond which are registered on the WWC Eco-Schools programme.

The Expo consists of ten interactive learning stations each illustrating the importance of protecting the environment so that people can have a better life -or according to the pamphlet distributed at the expo: illustrating “things we can do to mess up less and how to live with the mess people have already made.”

The children were fascinated to see pictures and hear the calls of the 18 frogs found in the Overberg at the “Clean Water and role of the Wetlands” stand.

Pupils from Die Bron Primary in Stanford learning about the importance of frogs and the wetlands. Photo: Scenic South

Pupils from Die Bron Primary in Stanford learning about the importance of frogs and the wetlands.

Here they are learning about growing their own vegetables and “recycling” food waste through vermiculture and composting…

Pupils from a primary schoolin Stanford in the Overberg learning about vemiculture, composting and growing one's own vegetables. Photo: Scenic South

…  about the importance of conserving our water resources…

Pupils at the Whale Coast Conservation School's Expo learning about water conservation. Photo: Scenic South

… about the Overberg Municipality’s Blue Drop and Green Drop programmes…

Pupils at the Whale Coast Conservation School's Expo learning about the Overberg Municipality's Blue Drop and Green Drop programmes. Photo: Scenic South

… about plastic recycling and waste management …

Pupils at the Whale Coast Conservation School's Expo learning about plastic recycling and waste management. Photo: Scenic South

and about using ‘wonder boxes’, solar cookers, rocket stoves and other simple devices to cook nutritious meals and to save electricity.

Pupils at the Whale Coast Conservation School's Expo in Stanford learning about cooking methods using the wonder box, rocket stove and solar cookers. Photo: Scenic South

Other exhibits included ‘upcycling’ – “turning waste into wow” by finding new uses for items one would normally throw away; marine debris and Blue Flag beaches; the Abagold Wave Energy Converter and sustainable energy alternatives to Eskom power.

For more information about the resources of and the work done by the Whale Coast Conservation organisation see http://www.whalecoastconservation.org.za/

Viv