In correspondence with Dr Allan Connell about the Noordhoek fish (Oarfish? Ribbonfish? Unicornfish?), I received the following photos of some of the extraordinary and very beautiful little creatures that are found in our oceans.

Dr Connell writes: 

Atlantid heteropod, probably of the genus Atlanta. Heteropods are planktonic gastropods (seashells). Photo by Dr Allan ConnellI spend hours each week in the sea off Park Rynie, and do a lot of decompression stops where I watch little critters passing by.

 

Also in my fish egg samples, which are collected by pulling a plankton net across the sea surface for 10 minutes, I see some amazing critters, because I use a microscope to pick out the fish eggs from the sample. One of my all-time favourites is a tiny polychaete worm with a bad hair day!! (Polychaete larva 0005 attached).

 

Atlantid heteropod, probably of the genus Atlanta. Heteropods are planktonic gastropods (seashells).Photo by Dr Allan ConnellFrom squid egg balloons to colour pulsating ctenophores, heteropods, syphonophores and jellyfishes, they all entertain us and help to pass the time of decompression. I have over the years collected a small library of strange marine critters. Attached are a few.

See also

http://scenicsouth.co.za//2013/02/the-noordhoek-fish-a-ribbonfish-an-oarfish-or-unicornfish/

http://scenicsouth.co.za//2013/01/strange-fish-washed-up-on-noordhoek-beach-oar-fish-ribbon-fish/

 

and for other touching wildlife encounters…

http://scenicsouth.co.za//environment/

Polychaete larva 0005. Photo by Dr Allan Connell

 

 

 

 

Polychaete larva 39. Photo by Dr Allan Connell

 

 

Phyllirhoe planktonic nudibranch.  Photo by Dr Allan Connell