Foraging for a fabulous meal of fynbos and garden greens and flowers at the Good Hope Nursery on Saturday was a novel experience for my hubby and me and a group of our friends. Under the expert guidance of Roushanna and Gael Gray we picked a selection of indigenous flowers, bulbs, seeds and leaves to create together a delicious and nutritious multi course meal, topped off with a scrumptious slice of Pelargonium tomentosum cake with mocha spearmint icing. Now that should whet your appetite!

Good Hope Nursery foraging feast. Photo: Harry von der Heyden

Roushanna cutting the mouthwatering Pelargonioum tomentosum cake. Photo Harry von der Heyden

Introducing herself Roushanna said: “When I moved to the area seven years ago, I loved cooking but knew nothing about plants. Then I fell in love with Gael’s son and the fynbos and started experimenting – cooking with plants grown in the nursery and in the surrounds. I have had delicious and disastrous results!”

 

We had the delicious.

 

Midway through an amble around the nursery and surrounds plucking flowers and leaves from edible plants and digging up some bulbs in the spirit of our ancestors, we stopped back at the base and enjoyed our starters:

 

Coleonema pulcellum (confetti bush)and Salvia chameleagna (wilde salie or aromatic sage) oat cakes

Salvia dentata goats milk ricotta

Whole onion and Salvia Africana-lutea relish

Jasminim multipartum tea

 

The foraging party at Good Hope Nursery. Photo Viv of Scenic South

The foraging party at Good Hope Nursery. Photo Viv of Scenic South

Nyum!

 

Donning hats we set out again for more foraging. Gael and Roushanna gave a running commentary on what plants and what parts of plants are edible and on those which are toxic. Gael warned that many plants are poisonous and that one should only eat plants that one can positively identify and that are known to be safe. “Some plants are edible only in certain seasons, or after certain preparations,” she said, adding that to collect plants in the wild one needs a permit from Cape Nature or permission from the landowner of the land one wishes to pick from.

Viv foraging at Good Hope Nursery. Photo Harry von der Heyden

Viv foraging at Good Hope Nursery. Photo Harry von der Heyden

“Never pick from a polluted roadside or anywhere that might have been sprayed. Also only pick what you need. If a plant is rare or the only one around, leave it alone. Rather plant local indigenous edibles into your own garden. In this way you will have the plants on your doorstep and be in tune with nature and its rhythms,” she said.

 

We were not only taught the culinary uses of the plants, but also their medicinal uses. Pelargonium cucculatum for example is used medicinally as a tea for stomach disorders while an infusion of the leaves in one’s bath water will help soothe aches and pains and muscle strain. The fleshy leaves of the wild fig rubbed on bee and blue bottle stings will bring relief to the victim of the venomous beasties while and tea made from the leaves of Salvia chamaeleagna is used to treat fevers, colds, coughs and sore throats.

 

Foraging for a feast at Good Hope Nursery' Photo Harry von der Heyden

Kim’s expression (centre) shows the delight we all felt at collecting gathering the ingredients for our feast. Photo Harry von der Heyden

After greeting the pig who was in the patch where goats had eaten the remains of last season’s harvest – both the pig and the goats fertilizing the soil and the pig loosening it up in preparation for the next planting – we returned to base to prepare together the main course which included the very tasty

 

Spring Greens Soup with nettle, marog and spinach

and

Tulbaghia rolls with farm butter

both of which had been pre-prepared by Roushanna (For the recipe for this excellent soup see http://scenicsouth.co.za//2013/10/spring-weeds-in-the-garden-and-for-your-lunch-by-roushanna-gray-of-good-hope-nursery/)

 

Baskets containing the ingredients for our multi-course foraging feast at Good Hope Nursery: Photo Viv of Scenic South

Baskets containing the ingredients for our multi-course foraging feast at Good Hope Nursery: Photo Viv of Scenic South

With tactful suggestions from the French chef in our midst, Nadège Lepoittevin-Dasse , we created two salads which included onion bulbs and stems, wild garlic, fennel leaves, fresh coriander seeds, cornflowers, calendula flowers, borage, a variety of lettuce leaves and baby carrots with a dressing of olive oil, lemon juice and garlic buchu for flavouring.

 

The salad creators at Good Hope Nursry foraging feast: Photo: Harry von der Heyden

The salad creators at Good Hope Nursry foraging feast: Photo: Harry von der Heyden

While the salad makers were chopping and chatting outside, the stirfriers were creating a delicious hot dish of Dune Spinach with olive oil and lemon and another dish which included some of the greens we had used in the salads as well as the tiny crunchy leaves of the Spekboom.

 

 

The stir-friers. Sue, Eva and Caroline at Good Hope Nursry foraging feast: Photo:Viv of Scenic South

The stir-friers. Sue, Eva and Caroline at Good Hope Nursry foraging feast: Photo:Viv of Scenic South

What a feast of flavours! Complementing the greens was an I-wanna-have more relish made from beetroot, fennel seed and Pelargonium citronellum on bree and camembert cheese, washed down with fresh fynbos iced tea.

 

Phew! Amazed at how replete we felt after what my family would call a meal of “bokkos” (buck food) we needed another walk around the nursery – with the opportunity to buy plants at a 10% discount – to make room for the dessert – that scrumptious slice of pelargonium cake mentioned above. Unfortunately our sojourn at the nursery was cutting into ‘rugby time’ so we had to leave before the buchu brandy – but then, Gael and Roushanna had stimulated our interest in experimenting with the weeds and plants growing in our garden to such an extent that we planned on making our own!

 

Watch this space!

Viv

See also

http://scenicsouth.co.za//2012/11/splashes-of-normandy-in-fish-hoek/

A note from Roushanna:

In the school holidays we had two lovely kids forage mornings – focusing on edible flowers and wild herbs which we collected from the gardens and used to make and eat in scones. Please click on this link to see what we got up to! http://goodhopenursery.wordpress.com/2013/09/30/kids-forage-and-harvest-morning/
The next Kids Forage morning includes making and eating Pizza with foraged and harvested wild herbs, organic veg and edible flowers with fynbos iced tea. And of course meeting the farm animals, playing in the playground and nature drawings.
These will be held on
Saturday the 2nd of November R150
Saturday the 9th of November R150

and more in the Christmas school holidays.

Our next half day Forage Harvest and Feast course dates for adults –
Saturday the 19th of October R250
Sunday the 27th of October R250

In November we will also be organizing a seaweed course. Dates to be confirmed.

Tulbagia rolls, Spring Greens Soup and beetroot relish at Good Hope Nursery foraging feast. Photo Viv of Scenic South

Tulbagia rolls, Spring Greens Soup and beetroot relish at Good Hope Nursery foraging feast. Photo Viv of Scenic South